slug line

   

1979 MCA

LP. MCA 3088

 

CAS. MCAC 748

 

CD. MCAD 31358

1993 BGO records (2 on 1 CD)

CD. BGO CD 176

2002 Universal

CD. 31358

????  rainbow music group (australia)

CD. MFPCD 047
   
   
       
1 You used to kiss the girls 2:32 30 seconds preview
2 The negroes were dancing 2:43 30 seconds preview
3 Slug line 2:58 30 seconds preview
4 Madonna road 4:18 30 seconds preview
5 (No more) Dancing in the streets 2:21 30 seconds preview
6 Long night 5:17 30 seconds preview
7 The night that Kenny died 2:33 30 seconds preview
8 Radio girl 2:54 30 seconds preview
9 You're my love interest 3:14 30 seconds preview
10 Take off your uniform 4:06 30 seconds preview
11 Sharon's got a drugstore 2:11 30 seconds preview
12 Washable ink 3:15 30 seconds preview

Total running time:

38:22
 

Musicians

John Hiatt: Guitar

Vocals

Jerry Conway: Drums
Bruce Gary Drums
Thom Mooney Drums
B.J. Wilson Drums
Doug Yankus Guitar
Veyler Hildebrand: Bass

Jon Paris:

Guitar

Bass

Todd Cochran:

Organ

Piano

Keyboards

Etan McElroy:

Piano

Vocals

Background Vocals

   

Credits

Produced: Denny Bruce
Engineer: Russ Gary
Second Engineer: Michael Carnevale
original art direction: john van hamersveld
photographer: nick rozsa

management:

denny bruce

havana moon, hollywood

 

 

Note

  • All songs written by John Hiatt except "Madonna Road" (Jim Wismar/John Hiatt)

  • Recorded January 1979

 

press photo

 

allmusic.com

Conventional wisdom at the time was that MCA Records had signed John Hiatt (who had languished without a record contract for four years) with the idea that he would be their Elvis Costello a singer/songwriter in the fashionable punk/new wave style. Certainly, Hiatt has stripped down and roughed up from his Epic records here, fronting a straight-ahead guitar rock band (that was capable, of course, of playing the obligatory reggae number), eschewing the stylistic diversity he reveled in before, and throwing out snappy, aphoristic lyrics in a highly processed voice. None of this quite turns him into Elvis Costello, although the mean streak he reveals would serve him well later.