Greatest hits and more

   

1998, A&M

2 CD. 540 874-2
   

 

 

CD 1

 
1

Have a little faith in me

(From Bring The Family)

4:03 30 seconds preview
2

Radio girl

(From slug line)

2:54 30 seconds preview
3

Washable ink

(From slug line)

3:15 30 seconds preview
4

Slug line

(From slug line)

2:58 30 seconds preview
5

Pink bedroom

(from two bit monsters)

2:53 30 seconds preview
6

Riding with the king

(from riding with the king)

3:06 30 seconds preview
7

When we ran

(from warming up to the ice age)

4:42 30 seconds preview
8

The crush

(from warming up to the ice age)

4:11 30 seconds preview
9

Living a little, laughing a little

(from warming up to the ice age)

4:03 30 seconds preview
10

Alone in the dark

(From Bring The Family)

4:46 30 seconds preview
11

Memphis in the meantime

(From Bring The Family)

4:00 30 seconds preview
12 Icy blue heart

(From Slow Turning)

4:34 30 seconds preview
13

Drive south

(From Slow Turning)

3:55 30 seconds preview
14 Tip of my tongue

(From Bring The Family)

5:53 30 seconds preview
15 Stolen moments

(from stolen moments)

4:12 30 seconds preview
16 Thing called love

(From Bring The Family)

4:13 30 seconds preview
17 Lipstick sunset

(From Bring The Family)

4:12 30 seconds preview

Total running time:

68:30
       
 

CD 2

   
1 Georgia Rae

(From Slow Turning)

4:26 30 seconds preview
2 Feels like rain

(From Slow Turning)

4:51 30 seconds preview
3

Buffalo river home

(from perfectly good guitar)

5:11 30 seconds preview
4 Ride along

(From Slow Turning)

3:31 30 seconds preview
5 Slow turning

(From Slow Turning)

3:36 30 seconds preview
6 Is anybody there

(From Slow Turning)

5:01 30 seconds preview
7

Real fine love

(from stolen moments)

4:21 30 seconds preview
8 One kiss

(from stolen moments)

4:22 30 seconds preview
9 Bring back your love to me

(from stolen moments)

4:04 30 seconds preview
10 Thirty years of tears

(from stolen moments)

4:08 30 seconds preview
11 Through your hands

(from stolen moments)

4:49 30 seconds preview
12 I'll never get over you

(from perfectly good guitar)

4:36 30 seconds preview
13 Stolen moments 4:12 30 seconds preview
14 Cross my fingers

(from perfectly good guitar)

4:02 30 seconds preview
15 Old habits

(from perfectly good guitar)

4:42 30 seconds preview
16

Perfectly good guitar

(from perfectly good guitar)

4:38 30 seconds preview
17 Something wild

(from perfectly good guitar)

4:31 30 seconds preview

Total running time:

74:38
 

Note

  • All songs written by John Hiatt, except "Living a little, laughing a little" writen by Thom Bell & Linda creed and "Old habbits" written by John Hiatt and Marshall Chapman.

  • compiled by polyGram TV & catalogue, hilversum.

  • all tracks owned by A&M records inc., los angeles except: CD1 tracks 2-9 licensed from universal music B.V., the netherlands.

  • digitally processed and remastered by bart oranje - cinram nederland B.V.

  • design: studio eric wondergem BNO baarn, holland.

  • photography: cover, pages 2 and 4, mark seliger / pages 5 and 7, peter miller / page 8, robert frank.

 

Liner notes

Singer-songwriter John Hiatt has been an important and enduring figure in rock music. He's an artist who twists rock and soul and blues and r&b into rhythmic shapes. His raspy, blues-based singing has been compared with that of Bruce Springsteen. Throughout the years John excelled in several styles of music, including heartland rock, Philly soul, stately folk and countrified swing. He's consistently assembled fine backup groups featuring rock maestros like Ry Cooder and Nick Lowe. Ultimately, however, Hiatt's skill as a lyricist is the thread that ties his music together. Born August 20,1952 John Hiatt turned to writing songs during his traumatic childhood in Indianapolis. Within a two-year span his father died and his older brother committed suicide.
'I was an ugly kid. But when I put the guitar around my neck, it was like... instant Elvis', he recalls. John grew up one of seven children in a family where music became his only refuge. He quit high school when he was 16. Music was all he was interested in. By the time he was 18 he sought fame and fortune in the country music capital of Nashville, Tennessee, where he worked his way up from a $25-a-week staff songwriting job at Tree Publishing. At the same time he began performing his own material with a band called White Duck, then as a solo-singer. He signed up with Epic Records and made two albums, 'Hangin' Around The Observatory '( 1974) and 'Overcoats' (1975), which demonstrated his powerful songwriting ability but didn't draw customers. His debut album only sold 15.000 copies. He signed to MCA in Los Angeles in the late 70s and released 'Slug Line'(1979) and 'Two Bit Monsters' (1980), still without gaining a commercial following. Then came the Geffen period that produced 'All Of A Sudden' (1982), 'Riding With The King' (1984), and 'Warming Up To The Ice Age' (1985). All of Hiatt's early releases, though favorably received by many critics, failed to catch the attention of the music buying public. All that changed with the release of the chart breakthrough 'Bring The Family' (1987). Hiatt and his collaborators Ry Cooder, Jim Keltner, Nick Lowe and producer John Chelew had gathered in Los Angeles for a four-day marathon of live-in-the-studio recordings.

Wordsmith Hiatt bared more of himself on 'Bring The Family' than ever before. He permanently renounced alcohol and drugs and began the long process of putting his life back together.
He returned to songwriting with a vengeance, enjoying his newly found commercial success. The three recordings 'Bring The Family' (1987L 'Slow Turning' (1988) and 'Stolen Moments' (1990) were notable for their concentration of autobiographical material: harrowing, howling scenes of alcoholic despair, reminiscences of Hiatt's own youth, and serene love songs that reflected his new-found stability. John Hiatt's life has taken him down some dark roads, the results of which have been captured in many powerful and emotional songs. The earnest pain in a classic as 'Have A Little Faith In Me' showed us Hiatt salving his wounds in song. Hiatt has excelled at drawing small, intense pictures of everyday encounters: 'Icy Blue Heart', from 'Slow Turning', sketched a sad, defensive barroom conversation between a man and a woman. Other outstanding songs from 'Slow Turning' were 'Georgia Rae', a warm song written for his baby daughter, and the witty rock composition 'Thing Called Love', which was later covered by Bonnie Raitt for her 1989 'Nick Of Time' album. 'Stolen Moments', described by Hiatt as 'Parliament/Funkaldelic meets ZZ Top' is John Hiatt finally coming to terms with being John Hiatt. He's filled the album with 'darn love songs' like 'Real Fine Love'. The song 'Bring Back Your Love To Me' was awarded the BMI's 1991 Country Music Award. In 1992 Hiatt again teamed with Cooder, Lowe, and Keltner, this time in a group called Little Village that released a wellreceived debut album. Hiatt's eleventh solo album 'Perfectly Good Guitar', featuring guest musicians Michael Ward and drummer Brian McLeod, was recorded in a two-week period. It's his most raw, kick-ass rock album, recorded with Faith No More producer Matt Wallace, containing pretty dark subjects as sexual abuse and utter maniacs who've lost all sense of reality. Hiatt has long specialized in fast-moving, vivid stories that often conclude with some type of ironic twist. 'Walk On' (1995), written during his 13-month 'Perfectly Good Guitar' tour, featured guest appearances by Bonnie Raitt and the Jayhawks. 1996 saw the release of 'Little Head', his most comfortable, 'fun' record, because it wasn't stuffed with angst-ridden masterpieces. Little Head is the sound of John Hiatt enjoying this moment in his life, cruising down the road in that pink Cadillac. So far Hiatt has composed more than 600 songs. Many of those songs have been covered by Rick Nelson, Dave Edmunds, the Searchers, Three Dog Night, Conway Twitty, Maria Muldaur, Rodney Crowell, Bob Dylan, Iggy Pop, Willie Nelson, Rosanne Cash, the Neville Brothers, and many others.

 

allmusic.com

This European import joins the already swelling ranks of John Hiatt compilations. It's a more or less decent cross-sampling of Hiatt's career, sweeping through early work like 1979's "Radio Girl," into favorites of his thriving mid-period like "Memphis in the Meantime," "Slow Turning," and "Real Fine Love." It also kicks off Disc One with the touching crowd-pleaser "Have a Little Faith in Me." But while it's a satisfactory retrospective of a rangy and talented artist, Greatest Hits and More's import status places it in the cracks between sets aimed at the casual fan like Hiatt's edition of the 20th Century Masters series and Anthology, Hip-O's definitive statement on the singer/songwriter's legacy.